Pangolin Meat Price

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Pangolin meat is considered a delicacy in some countries, and the illegal trade in pangolins for their meat and scales has put pressure on wild populations, which has led to an increase in the price of pangolin meat.

Here are some key points about the price of pangolin meat:

  • Research has found that pangolin prices are on the rise, fetching upwards of US $600 per kilogram today in comparison to US $14 per kilogram during the 1990s.
  • Chinese buyers will pay anywhere between $3 and $20 for a pangolin, while traffickers can get as much as $250 for the scales from one pangolin in markets in Asia.
  • In 2019, Singaporean officials discovered approximately 14.2 tons of pangolin scales stuffed in 230 bags, worth an estimated $38.7 million.
  • Pangolin meat is eaten as a luxury dish in high-end urban restaurants, and scales are used to treat a range of ailments in traditional medicine.
  • In Vietnam, pangolin meat sells for as much as $350 per kilogram.
  • The price of pangolin parts in China has risen dramatically from 2008 to 2017, with live pangolins once sold for $80 per kilogram in 2008 and commanding a price of more than $200 per kilogram in 2017.

The illegal trade in pangolins for their meat and scales has led to an increase in the price of pangolin meat, which has put pressure on wild populations.

The high price of pangolin meat has also made it a luxury dish in some countries, which has further fueled demand for this vulnerable mammal.

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Illegal Wildlife Trade

The illegal wildlife trade in pangolins has had a significant impact on the price of pangolin meat, as demand for this delicacy has driven illegal hunting and trafficking.

Here are some key points:

  • The illegal trade in pangolins for their meat and scales has put pressure on wild populations, and loss of habitat from illegal deforestation has also impacted their survival.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins has grown to the point that geographic boundaries are blurring, with vast quantities of them being smuggled from Africa to Asia, despite an international trade ban on all eight pangolin species that went into effect in 2017.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins is only growing, and organized international criminal networks that previously dealt predominantly with African elephant ivory are increasingly turning to pangolins.
  • The Wildlife Justice Commission identified 27 countries and territories involved as sources, transits, or destinations for pangolin scale shipments, with six places in particular linked to 94 percent of the overall contraband: China, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Singapore, Nigeria, and Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins has led to an increase in the price of pangolin meat, with pangolin prices on the rise, fetching upwards of US $600 per kilogram today in comparison to US $14 per kilogram during the 1990s.
  • Pangolin meat is eaten as a luxury dish in high-end urban restaurants, and scales are used to treat a range of ailments in traditional medicine.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins has led to poaching and illegal trade, which has further threatened their survival.
  • Criminals now have access to the world’s biggest marketplace through e-commerce, social media, and search platforms, enabling them to advertise illegally traded species and process transactions with minimal risk.

The illegal wildlife trade in pangolins has had a significant impact on the price of pangolin meat, as demand for this delicacy has driven illegal hunting and trafficking.

The illegal trade in pangolins has led to poaching and illegal trade, which has further threatened their survival.

Market Dynamics

The market dynamics of pangolin meat are influenced by various factors, including supply, demand, and market trends.

Here are some key points:

  • The illegal trade in pangolins for their meat and scales has put pressure on wild populations, and loss of habitat from illegal deforestation has also impacted their survival.
  • The demand for pangolin meat is driven by its use as a luxury dish in high-end urban restaurants and its perceived medicinal value in traditional medicine.
  • The price of pangolin meat has increased due to the high demand and the illegal nature of the trade, with pangolin prices on the rise, fetching upwards of US $600 per kilogram today in comparison to US $14 per kilogram during the 1990s.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins has grown to the point that geographic boundaries are blurring, with vast quantities of them being smuggled from Africa to Asia, despite an international trade ban on all eight pangolin species that went into effect in 2017.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins is only growing, and organized international criminal networks that previously dealt predominantly with African elephant ivory are increasingly turning to pangolins.
  • The availability of pangolin meat is influenced by factors such as habitat loss, poaching, and illegal trade, which can impact the supply of pangolin meat.
  • The willingness of consumers to consume pangolin meat is influenced by factors such as curiosity, novelty, and cultural traditions.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins has led to poaching and illegal trade, which has further threatened their survival.

The market dynamics of pangolin meat are influenced by various factors, including supply, demand, and market trends.

The illegal nature of the trade and the high demand for pangolin meat have led to an increase in its price, while factors such as habitat loss, poaching, and illegal trade can impact the supply of pangolin meat.

The willingness of consumers to consume pangolin meat is influenced by factors such as curiosity, novelty, and cultural traditions.

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Pangolin Meat Consumption

Pangolin meat consumption is driven by cultural and dietary factors in various regions.

Here are some key points:

  • In Guangdong, China, pangolin meat is consumed as a luxury dish in high-end urban restaurants, and scales are used to treat a range of ailments in traditional medicine.
  • In Cameroon, forest cover and social relations are more important than economic factors in driving hunting and bushmeat consumption, including pangolin meat.
  • In Benin, the pangolin trade is based on endogenous practices now influenced by economic drivers such as higher prices and commercialization.
  • In urban centers of Cameroon, the biggest barriers to bushmeat consumption were its illegality and high price, but pangolin was still among the most desired types of bushmeat.
  • In China and Vietnam, pangolin meat is prized as a delicacy and believed to have nutritional and medicinal value.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins for their meat and scales has put pressure on wild populations, and loss of habitat from illegal deforestation has also impacted their survival.
  • The demand for pangolin meat is driven by its use as a luxury dish in high-end urban restaurants and its perceived medicinal value in traditional medicine.
  • The illegal nature of the trade and the high demand for pangolin meat have led to an increase in its price, with pangolin prices on the rise, fetching upwards of US $600 per kilogram today in comparison to US $14 per kilogram during the 1990s.

Pangolin meat consumption is driven by cultural and dietary factors in various regions, with pangolin meat being consumed as a luxury dish, a traditional medicine, and a desired type of bushmeat.

The illegal trade in pangolins for their meat and scales has put pressure on wild populations, and the high demand for pangolin meat has led to an increase in its price.

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Economic Implications

The illegal trade in pangolins for their meat and scales has significant economic consequences, including impacts on local economies and livelihoods.

Here are some key points:

  • The illegal trade in pangolins can threaten security, hinder economic development, and contribute to the spread of disease.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins is driven by foreign influence and demand for scarce animal products, which can impact local economies and livelihoods.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins has put pressure on wild populations, and loss of habitat from illegal deforestation has also impacted their survival.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins has led to poaching and illegal trade, which has further threatened their survival.
  • In some regions, pangolin meat is consumed as a luxury dish, a traditional medicine, and a desired type of bushmeat, which can drive demand and impact local economies.
  • The illegal nature of the trade and the high demand for pangolin meat have led to an increase in its price, which can impact local economies and livelihoods.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins can also have negative impacts on tourism, as the loss of biodiversity can impact the attractiveness of natural areas to tourists.

The illegal trade in pangolins for their meat and scales has significant economic consequences, including impacts on local economies and livelihoods.

The illegal nature of the trade and the high demand for pangolin meat have led to an increase in its price, which can impact local economies and livelihoods.

The loss of biodiversity can also impact the attractiveness of natural areas to tourists, which can have negative impacts on tourism.

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Conservation Efforts and Price

Conservation efforts, such as anti-poaching measures and habitat protection, are affecting the price of pangolin meat.

Here are some key points:

  • The illegal trade in pangolins for their meat and scales has put pressure on wild populations, and loss of habitat from illegal deforestation has also impacted their survival.
  • The illegal nature of the trade and the high demand for pangolin meat have led to an increase in its price, with pangolin prices on the rise, fetching upwards of US $600 per kilogram today in comparison to US $14 per kilogram during the 1990s.
  • Conservation efforts, such as anti-poaching measures and habitat protection, can impact the supply of pangolin meat, which can impact its price.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins has led to poaching and illegal trade, which has further threatened their survival.
  • Conservation efforts, such as the development of pangolin-specific monitoring methods linked to anti-trafficking efforts, are the highest conservation priority for these mammals.
  • Operation Pangolin, a conservation initiative launched in Cameroon and Gabon, aims to save the world’s most trafficked wild mammal, the pangolin, and alter the conservation landscape for pangolins and other wildlife threatened by illicit human behavior.
  • The fight to stop pangolin extinction involves efforts to reduce the demand for pangolin meat and scales, as well as efforts to protect pangolin habitats and prevent illegal trade.

Conservation efforts, such as anti-poaching measures and habitat protection, can impact the supply of pangolin meat, which can impact its price.

The illegal trade in pangolins has led to poaching and illegal trade, which has further threatened their survival.

Conservation efforts, such as the development of pangolin-specific monitoring methods linked to anti-trafficking efforts, are the highest conservation priority for these mammals.

The fight to stop pangolin extinction involves efforts to reduce the demand for pangolin meat and scales, as well as efforts to protect pangolin habitats and prevent illegal trade.

Health Risks

The consumption of pangolin meat poses health risks, including the potential for zoonotic diseases, which can influence the market and its pricing.

Here are some key points:

  • Pangolins themselves are not known to carry any viruses that can infect humans, but they do carry parasites in their scales like ticks, which can spread vector-borne diseases.
  • The outbreak of COVID-19 has been linked to a coronavirus originating in wild bats that jumped to people through an intermediate host, possibly a pangolin.
  • Studies have suggested that pangolin health is related to nutrition and parasite infection, and that pangolins suffering from malnutrition and parasitic infections may be more susceptible to disease.
  • Conservation and health risks were the two most frequently reported reasons for reported negative attitudes towards pangolin consumption in Hong Kong.
  • The illegal trade in pangolins can threaten security, hinder economic development, and contribute to the spread of disease.
  • The illegal nature of the trade and the high demand for pangolin meat have led to an increase in its price, which can impact local economies and livelihoods.
  • The fight to stop pangolin extinction involves efforts to reduce the demand for pangolin meat and scales, as well as efforts to protect pangolin habitats and prevent illegal trade.
  • In Guangdong, China, scale consumption is primarily motivated by disease treatment, while the main reason for meat consumption is accidental, but among those who intentionally ate pangolin were motivated by curiosity or “showing off”.

The consumption of pangolin meat poses health risks, including the potential for zoonotic diseases, which can influence the market and its pricing.

The illegal trade in pangolins can threaten security, hinder economic development, and contribute to the spread of disease.

The fight to stop pangolin extinction involves efforts to reduce the demand for pangolin meat and scales, as well as efforts to protect pangolin habitats and prevent illegal trade.

Alternative Protein Sources

There are several alternative protein sources that can be promoted as substitutes for pangolin meat, which could help reduce demand and hence the price of pangolin meat.

Here are some potential sustainable protein sources:

  • Plant-based proteins: Plant-based proteins such as quinoa, lentils, chickpeas, and beans are good sources of protein and can be used as substitutes for meat in many dishes.
  • Farmed meats: Rather than consuming wild-caught animals, farmed meats such as chicken, beef, and pork can be used as substitutes for pangolin meat.
  • Insect-based proteins: Insects such as crickets, mealworms, and grasshoppers are high in protein and can be used as substitutes for meat in many dishes.
  • Cultivated meats: Cultivated meats, also known as lab-grown meats, are produced by growing animal cells in a lab and can be used as substitutes for traditional meat.
  • Artificial foods: Nutrient concentrations of pangolin artificial foods such as eggs, milk, chicken, and beef are different on both dry and fresh matter basis, and can be used as substitutes for pangolin meat.

Promoting alternative protein sources such as plant-based proteins, farmed meats, insect-based proteins, cultivated meats, and artificial foods could help reduce demand for pangolin meat and hence its price.

In conclusion, these sustainable protein sources can be used as substitutes for pangolin meat in many dishes, and can help to reduce the pressure on wild pangolin populations.

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